Jack Kenny

Tuesday, 11 March 2014 00:00

Has Rand Paul Gone Neocon on the Ukraine?

Has Rand Paul gone "Neocon Lite" over Russia's invasion of Ukraine? Paul, who has been widely regarded as a non-interventionist like his father, 12-term congressman and three-time presidential candidate Ron Paul, is sounding the alarm over the Ukraine turmoil as though it were right on America's doorstep.

The day after he won the Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll of potential GOP presidential candidates, with a 3-1 lead over his nearest rival, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul said a clear focus on the issue of privacy in the midst of America's growing surveillance state is necessary if the Republican Party is going to grow and win elections again.

 

 

Senator John McCain yesterday accused Senator Ted Cruz of having "crossed a line" when the Texas Republican claimed that the GOP's most recent losing presidential candidates "don't stand for principle."

Hot-button social issues were stressed by Republican leaders and conservative activists at Friday’s session of the annual CPAC conference.

It stretches reason to suggest that the Crimean Parliament permitting the people of Crimea to vote on whether to secede from Ukraine (and become a part of Russia) is a threat to U.S. or European security.

For Hillary Clinton, as for many Republicans, it's 1938 or '39 and Hitler is on the March again. Only this time his name is Putin and he is marching in Crimea. In both time and place, Hitler angst is a moveable feast.

Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) said "We're all Ukranians" in response to the Russian invasion and takeover of parts of Crimea.

Thursday, 27 February 2014 00:00

GOP Leaders to Meet on Alternative to ObamaCare

House Republican leaders have scheduled a meeting Friday to begin work on finding an alternative to the ObamaCare health insurance law.

There is no scientific proof of man-made climate change, a co-founder of Greenpeace told a committee of the U.S. Senate.

An Arizona state senator went on national television to defend the state's controversial religious-freedom bill against the steady drumbeat of opposition.