Jack Kenny

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has accused the United States of secretly working with the Taliban to facilitate terrorist attacks in order to demonstrate a need for U.S. troop presence in the war-torn country after the scheduled withdrawal of Western combat units at the end of next year.

 

 

 

This week's news of a report by the Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction raised some eyebrows and maybe some hackles among the taxpaying American public before falling down the memory hole. 

Keynote speaker Thomas Woods, a historian and best-selling author, drew nothing but ovations from the New Hampshire Free Staters when he spoke in Nashua last weekend in favor of state nullification.

Robert Gibbs, former press secretary for President Obama, said Sunday he was under orders during his White House years not to discuss or even acknowledge the existence of a "drone program." 

If Jill Biden follows her husband's shotgun advice, the vice president's wife could find herself on the wrong side of Delaware law. 

According to Senator Marco Rubio, "Our prosperity depends upon the liberal international order that America has supported since the end of World War II." In fact, his statements on foreign policy lead inevitably to the conclusion that he would expand that "liberal international order."

The recent death of former New York Mayor Ed Koch brings to mind one of the most controversial things he ever did as a Democrat in the heart of American liberalism.

If brevity is the soul of wit, it is unfortunate that Calvin Coolidge is remembered more for his greatly exaggerated brevity than for his frequently overlooked wit. Indeed, two of the famous quotes attributed to Coolidge have often been cited to suggest dullness rather than keenness of insight.

 

 

 

In an event likely to produce more heat than light, a committee of the New Hampshire legislature will on Thursday, February 14 — Valentine's Day, of all things — hold a public hearing on a resolution to "commemorate" the 40th anniversary of the United States Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade, issued January 22, 1973.

 

Lincoln's birthday, February 12, appears to have lost some of its former aura, as all presidents are now supposedly covered by the amorphous, all-purpose "Presidents' Day," but his time in office retains most of the luster that it acquired after he was killed.