Beverly K. Eakman

Unbeknownst to most Americans listening to 2012 campaign rhetoric, what’s being pitched is “free-market socialism." An oxymoron? Not exactly. “Free-market socialism,” a version of “market socialism,” is so named because it does not involve planners, as most of us understand that word. It is, in essence, a kinder and gentler form of highly regulated enterprise that nevertheless steers a nation toward an entitlement society with an emphasis on government-supplied jobs under the guise of entrepreneurship and “open” markets.

Long-time Washington commentator and columnist Tony Blankley delivered an uncharacteristically flawed analysis of America’s political prospects in a July 12 commentary for the Washington Times. He foresees a likely reversal of the United States' current statist course and a restoration of constitutionally limited government.

Here�s one for late-night jokester Jay Leno�s weekly �Headlines� segment featuring Stupid Criminals � his favorite target. Although, he might want to consider a sister segment to his repertoire: Clueless Victims.

Thursday, 03 February 2011 09:28

Why Police "Don't Get No Respect"

The shooting rampage in Detroit last week has spurred a re-thinking of so-called “community policing” — a method of making law enforcement appear accessible, friendly, and open to neighborhood folk. Such was par for the course in the 1950s, but then was abandoned in the volatile 1960s, when leftist radicals started inciting students and minorities to attack authority figures. School principals and college professors were barricaded in their offices; police and other law enforcement officers were called “pigs”; squad cars were bombed; anti-riot and SWAT teams were hit with rocks, bricks, and bottles. That the perpetrators of these early, bona fide “hate crimes” constituted but a relatively small, misguided few didn’t seem to make much difference to our nation’s leaders inasmuch as the ruckus could be exploited by an already left-leaning press. 

First, the short version: Privacy? "Fuggedaboudit!"

You can encrypt your messages, lock your laptop and password-protect your various accounts till your fingers fall off. You can purchase “gee-whiz” software packages to control spam and spyware, construct endless filters to screen unwanted e-mail and phone calls. You can install parent-control devices on your TV, inputting “prohibited” keywords till you’re blue in the face. You can report abuse and “scrub” old computers.

On June 20, the Supreme Court ruled that states cannot invoke federal common law in an effort to limit so-called greenhouse-gas emissions.

It was announced June 15 that scientists are now fairly sure that around 2020, sunspot activity is going to lessen significantly. All the conditions for it are lining up so far. In layman’s language, less active sun, with fewer sunspots, can produce cooling because solar flares are diminished. Technically, this condition is a “solar minimum.” The last time it happened, experts say, we had a “Little Ice Age.”

Monday, 18 April 2011 16:30

Book Review: Now Tell Me I Was Wrong

Tom DeWeese is among the unsung heroes of the real conservative activist movement, the one that focuses on individual (as opposed to collective) liberty, free enterprise (sans the uber-regulations aimed at paring it down), private property rights and personal privacy (under unprecedented assault since 2001), and U.S. sovereignty (instead of global governance). He is founder and president of the Washington, DC-Metro-based American Policy Center, a privately funded think tank founded in 1988.

Wednesday, 10 November 2010 10:15

Book Review: Sapping Americans’ Shrewdness

Free-Range KidsFree-Range Kids: Giving Our Children the Freedom We Had Without Going Nuts With Worry, by Lenore Skenazy, Jossey-Bass Publishers (a Wiley Imprint): San Francisco, Calif., 2009, 256 pages, hardcover, $24.99.

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or, Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30), by Mark Bauerlein, Penguin Publishers: New York, 2009, 270 pages, paperback, $15.95.

Just How Stupid Are We? Facing the Truth About the American Voter, by Rick Shenkman, Basic Books (Perseus Book Group): New York, 2009, 242 pages, paperback, $14.95.

I was out grocery shopping when the news on the giant store monitor hit: Once again, there had been shootings at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, Virginia, 40 miles southwest of Roanoke. The last bloodbath there was in 2007, involving some 30 students at the hands of Seung Hui Cho, who apparently fell through the cracks of an, as-usual, clueless mental health system.

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