Bruce Walker

The latest financial news from Europe may fall into the “good news, bad news” category — although the “good news” simply means that things have not fallen apart as much as they could have. The problems of the Mediterranean Basin region of the European Union — France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece and Cyprus — reinforce that idea.

Seventy-five years ago, on August 5, 1937, one of the most horrific — and most ignored — episodes in human history began. “Operation Kulak” ("kulak" meaning rich peasants) was the Soviet Union’s effort to repress those farmers who had a little more than other farmers (according, at least, to the definitions of the Communist Party), and who resisted collectivization.

Saturday, 04 August 2012 18:00

Recalling the End of the Fairness Doctrine

Twenty-five years ago this month, the Federal Communications Commission ended the “Fairness Doctrine,” which in the name of "fairness" infringed on the freedom of speech of radio and television stations, in violation of the First Amendment.

Lydia Polgreen of the New York Times recently suggested that the long and bloody rule of Zimbabwe's Marxist boss Robert Mugabe may have a “golden lining” for citizens of that benighted country. In an incredibly violent continent, Mugabe stands as one of the worst rulers. Some estimates put the number of Zimbabweans killed by his thugs at around half a million. Critics of Polgreen's article ask how the torture, enslavement, and murder of millions and the impoverishment of one of the formerly most prosperous nations on the African continent — previously known as Rhodesia — can have any “golden lining.”

Lew Rockwell has suggested a major change in how we educate our young: End public education, at least as an experiment in a few communities, and see real education take place.

What would happen if a state decided to try an alternative to what has been practiced since compulsory Prussian-style government education was introduced in American in the early 19th century? If eliminating public in favor of private education were tried just as an experiment for a few school districts in America, no great harm could result — and it might very well do a great deal of good.

Hercules Industries in Colorado is a family company and it offers good jobs and generous benefits to its employees. But it does not want the federal government compelling it to act against the conscience of its owners.

While many Americans who take the traditional Judeo-Christian values of America seriously have extolled the virtues of a happy marriage, economists and social scientists — many of them studying the situation from a secular point of view — are now coming to the same conclusion. These experts agree that single parenting accounts for much of modern poverty.

Seventy-five years ago President Franklin D. Roosevelt tried to pack the Supreme Court in order to insure that his extra-constitutional New Deal policies would be upheld. But though FDR's packing scheme failed, the court got the message.

The Council of Europe convention is attempting to redefine “gender” to mean "the socially constructed roles, behaviors, activities and attributes that a given society considers appropriate for women and men.” But the bishops of Poland, joined by a number of pro-life and pro-family groups in Europe, are pushing the Polish government not to ratify the convention.

President Obama recently commented that business success relied upon government to succeed. Operators of lemonade stands, however, have found govenrment an obstacle, not an aid, to success.