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Maria Franziska von Trapp, the last surviving member of the singing family whose story inspired the movie The Sound of Music, died February 18 at her home in Vermont at the age of 99.

Pete Seeger's involvement and promotion of radical communist causes and fronts during his lifetime was deliberately glossed over in accounts of his death by the mainstream media.

 

 

 

Fifty years ago today, C.S. Lewis died of kidney failure at his home in Oxford, England, and Great Britain is observing the 50th anniversary of the death of one of heir finest writers.

Charles ColsonCharles Colson (left), President Nixon’s notorious “hatchet man,” who spent time in prison in the wake of the Watergate scandal before founding an international ministry and becoming an esteemed Christian leader, has died at age 80. Colson became ill March 30 while leading a meeting of Christian leaders at the Colson Center for Christian Worldview in Lansdowne, Virginia. The following morning he had surgery to remove a pool of clotted blood from the surface of his brain, and while doctors were initially optimistic about his recovery, his condition became grave and he died April 21 surrounded by his family.

The "bio" of legendary New York journalist Jimmy Breslin says he "has been a columnist since 1963, when he won national attention by covering John F. Kennedy's assassination from the emergency room in the Dallas hospital and, later, from the point of view of the President's gravedigger at Arlington Cemetery." Small wonder, then, that he became even more famous as the chronicler of the New York Mets in their maiden season, with a book called Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? A man who would dig up a story from the vantage point of the gravedigger would be the perfect storyteller of the worst team in modern baseball history. The team somehow won 40 games in that 1962 season while losing 120, some of them in ways never before seen by the team's manager, Casey Stengel, who by that time had, by his own rough count, "been in baseball a hundred years."

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