Got privilege? Because if you’ve got the rap, rationalizations, and rhetoric to bloviate about “white privilege,” you can make millions. Glenn Singleton sure has.

Glen Allen High School in Henrico, Virginia, provoked ire from parents after it showed an animated film to its students during two assemblies for Black History Month that portrayed white runners at a significant advantage over black runners. Parents sharply criticized what they dubbed as “white guilt,” prompting the school board to cut the video from its materials and the superintendent to admit that the video was likely not the best way to open up a dialogue about race.

With help and funding from the federal government, Big Brother is about to get inside your child's mind — literally. Emerging technologies backed by the U.S. Department of Education are already being deployed in “education,” with federal education bureaucrats hoping to eventually use those tools to monitor and track everything from children's “mindsets” and “attitudes” to their “emotions” and “cognitive processes.” Much of it is being pursued under the guise of improving and individualizing schooling. But the reality is probably not that simple. Experts have been warning about the trends for decades. Even a layman, though, can see that the dire potential abuses of such technology.

One school system is arming its teachers, and not even the most passionate anti-gun zealot could say it isn’t Okay. It's the town of Okay in rural Wagoner County, Oklahoma, whose schools will now proudly be "Gun Free Zone" free.

After years of running up against unconstitutional federal education mandates imposed on states using bribes and bludgeoning from Washington, D.C., a group of parents and grassroots education activists from across America is launching a fresh effort to shut down the U.S. Department of Education once and for all. The mission: “Stop Fed Ed.”