The case of eight-year-old Domenic Johansson, separated from his family by Swedish authorities last year over his parents’ decision to legally home school him, has prompted an international outcry from human rights groups, American home schooling organizations, and activists on the World Wide Web.

A school principal in Wrightstown, Wisconsin, has defended on constitutional grounds the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish at the school. Responding to a letter of protest from the mother of a kindergarten student, Principal Lee Mierow of Wrightstown Elementary School said he wanted to ensure that Spanish-speaking students understood the importance of the Pledge. But he also seemed to suggest students have a constitutionally guaranteed right to recite the pledge in the language of their choice while participating in the ritual at school.

A 14-year-old 8th grader from Ohio was the third Indian-American child in a row to win the prestigious Scripps National Spelling Bee. Once an event of humble classrooms and schools from the prairies to the shores, the fun and challenging spelling bee is now a U.S. national competition with this year’s coverage starting on ESPN last Thursday for the preliminaries, and ending with the finals in prime time Friday night on ABC.

Despite efforts in some states to counter the now-admitted failures of education policy at the state and federal levels, overall it has been a daunting, brutal, and thankless task.

The Board of Education of the Los Angeles Unified School District voted unanimously Tuesday to express "outrage" and "condemnation" of Arizona's new law on illegal immigration and another law that prohibits the teaching of "ethnic solidarity" in Arizona schools. The L.A. board instructed Superintendent of Schools Ramon Cortines to ensure that students are taught about Arizona laws "in the context of the American values of unity, diversity, and equal protection for all."

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