The Bellingham, Washington, school board announced that it has adopted a full-day kindergarten using the Common Core curriculum called HighScope.

Oklahoma has initiated tax breaks for people who contribute to organizations that provide funds for private-school scholarships — and even public-school workers favor it.

As the federally funded Common Core testing regime is rolled out across much of the nation, a growing rebellion against the tests and accompanying data-mining scheme is sweeping the country as well. In states all over America, parents and students are joining the “opt out” movement, refusing to take the controversial assessments funded and pushed by the Obama administration. Despite pushback from officials, many educators are encouraging children to refuse to take the tests, too. Because the national testing regime is so crucial to the overall plot to nationalize education via Common Core and compile Orwellian federal dossiers on each student, activists say the surging grassroots move to “opt out” has the potential to help derail the administration’s broader so-called “cradle-to-career” education “reform” agenda.

In a scathing resignation letter, Oklahoma City math teacher Juli Sylvan blasted the controversial Common Core standards and exposed numerous serious problems with the Obama-backed scheme — including the fact that it is being quietly implemented in apparent defiance of state law. Among the most troubling elements, according to Sylvan — a veteran teacher with more than two decades in the classroom — is the data-mining of children, which she said she is not willing to facilitate. However, the problems with the administration-promoted national school standards are much more wide ranging. From using ineffective teaching methods and imposing a one-size-fits-all education model to doing away with individualism and confusing students, the Common Core disaster is growing even in Oklahoma. Unable to protect her students from the scheme any longer, Sylvan said her only remaining option was to resign from the profession she loves. Lawmakers are aware of the resignation and looking into the matter.

A recently released report from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) indicated that American “millennials” (those born after 1980 who were 16 to 34 years of age at the time of the study) scored near the bottom of the pack among 23 countries evaluated for various skills.