With nationwide outrage escalating quickly over the Obama-backed nationalization of education through “Common Core” standards, Manchester, the largest school district in New Hampshire, voted last week to move beyond the national scheme and create its own set of superior standards. Under intense public pressure to reject the establishment’s controversial program entirely, the school board refused to adopt Common Core and the curriculum aligned with it. Instead, however, they voted to create “The Manchester Academic Standards” (TMAS) — using the national standards as a supposed “floor.” Both sides are claiming victory, but the battle is far from finished.  

With the national uproar over the Obama administration-backed “Common Core” nationalization of education reaching a fever pitch from Florida and Louisiana to New Hampshire and Wisconsin, education expert Dr. Duke Pesta is now speaking out in an exclusive video for The New American about the looming nationwide school standards for history, science, and sexuality.

As outrage grows surrounding the nationalization of American education through “Common Core,” a scheme to harmonize school standards led by the establishment and the Obama administration, lawmakers in Wisconsin have finally begun holding long-awaited hearings on the deeply controversial effort. In an in-studio video produced by The New American, educational expert Mary Black, who testified at the state Capitol about the myriad dangers of Common Core, explained what happened at the hearing.

Two boys have been suspended from school in recent days for bringing gun-like objects to school — in one case, a keychain; in the other, fingers.

In an exclusive studio interview with The New American magazine’s Dr. Duke Pesta, Heartland Institute Education Research Fellow Joy Pullmann outlined the crucial link between the Obama-backed “Common Core” nationalization of schooling, the federally funded tests that go with the standards, and the vast data-gathering apparatus being erected by the administration to gather private information on U.S. students. The Common Core assessments, which have already been adopted by about four in five states, are a key element underpinning the entire scheme, she explained, calling it the "enforcement mechanism."