A deeply controversial and secretive education curriculum system known as “CSCOPE,” used by more than two thirds of Texas schools, has come under heavy fire in recent weeks, with critics saying it promotes anti-Christian propaganda and so-called “progressive” values at odds with American traditions of liberty and self-government. Parents, teachers, experts, activists, and others were outraged. After lawmakers got involved, however, critics scored some partial victories against the program.

The Center for American Progress, a close ally of the Obama administration, has proposed federal funding for universal preschool and child care — a plan that might end up in Obama's State of the Union speech.

“Can’t kids be kids anymore?” asked Maryland attorney Robin Ficker.

In today’s hysterical anti-gun atmosphere, the answer, at least for public-school students, is apparently no. The day after a first-grade boy in Ficker’s state was suspended from school for using his fingers as a gun during recess, a kindergarten girl in Pennsylvania was sent home for 10 days merely for telling her friends that she would shoot them with a Hello Kitty soap-bubble gun — a toy that was not even in her possession at the time.

A six-year-old boy was suspended from school in Trappe, Maryland, for the grave offense of using his fingers as an imaginary gun in a game of cops and robbers — the second such suspension in the Old Line State this month.

A student in a Texas school district lost her federal court case Tuesday after challenging the school’s radio-frequency ID tracking system.

Log in