In his January 9 State of the State address, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo unveiled a 10-point plan for so-called “women's equality,” a front-and-center element of which is an abortion expansion scheme that champions of the unborn warn will open the door to late-term abortion on demand.

An Illinois atheist has exhausted his final appeal in a two-and-one-half-year legal effort challenging the use of state funds for the renovation of a 50-year-old, 11-story Christian cross gracing the top of Illinois' tallest peak.

Many conservatives, especially Christians, have disengaged from political battle because of discouragement. But there’s no reason to quit or be discouraged.

As the nation marks the 40th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision that struck down a Texas law — and by extension, all states’ laws —that had criminalized abortion, the debate between those who uphold the right to life of the unborn and those who assert that a woman’s right to “choose” must be paramount, continues. And there is a category of individuals for whom the abortion issue is perhaps the most personal of all: those who have survived attempted abortions.

In Egypt a woman and her seven children have been imprisoned for converting to Christianity, while in North Korea, two Christians were killed for their faith.