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Faith and Morals

Can man alone make Heaven on Earth?  That has been the theme of secular collectivists for more than one hundred years. But as Pope Benedict XVI stated in his Easter homily this year, without God the scientific and technological advances of man are as much a curse as a blessing:

The Gallup pollsters have released their most recent report on which parts of the United States can boast the most religious residents, and predictably, those living in the Bible belt once again scored “above average” on questions of church attendance, importance of faith in their daily life, and the like, while those living in both northeastern and northwestern states scored “below average” in their emphasis on religious observance.

A street preacher who has handed out Bibles at Minneapolis’s “gay pride festival” for more than 15 years is suing the city’s Park Board for allowing the event’s organizers to relegate him to a “pride-free” zone. This year’s Pride Fest — which is definitely not what traditionalists would describe as a family-friendly event — is scheduled for June 23 and 24 in the Loring Park, a well-known center for homosexual activity.

A T-shirt company in Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the wrath of a local homosexual activist contingent after the business politely passed on producing T-shirts for the city’s “gay pride” festival. On March 26, Lexington’s Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO) filed a discrimination complaint against the family-owned company, Hands On Originals, alleging that the firm had bid on producing the shirts, but when it was selected its owners changed their minds, explaining that their Christian values made them unable to fill the order for the “gay”-themed apparel.

AnchorageThe battle is heating up in Anchorage, Alaska, over a voter initiative that would add “sexual orientation” and “transgender identity” to anti-discrimination language in the city’s municipal code. Homosexual activists insist that Prop 5, which the city’s nearly 300,000 residents will vote on April 3, is a common sense measure that “simply provides to gay and transgender Alaskans the same legal protections that we already provide to other persons in Anchorage in employment, financial practices, housing, and restaurants, department stores, and other businesses,” according to OneAnchorage.com, a website promoting passage of the measure.

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