Faith and Morals

A North Carolina county has thumbed its nose at the state’s ACLU franchise, which has been warning county officials all over the state to stop opening government meetings with prayer. As reported by the Associated Press, a “Rowan County commissioner opened the board’s [March 5] meeting with a Christian prayer, despite a warning from the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union that it would violate the law and potentially trigger a lawsuit. As has long been the elected board’s practice, Commissioner Jon Barber (left) opened the public meeting with an invocation asking for a blessing in the name of Jesus.”

PrayerA nationally renowned faith-based legal advocacy organization is suing the Seaside Public Library in Oregon for denying the group the use of a meeting room to hold a biblical education seminar. The Virginia-based group Liberty Counsel (LC), which holds Christian worldview seminars around the nation, had contacted the library in 2010 about scheduling a meeting room for one of its seminars, but library officials flatly rejected the request, citing a policy prohibiting “religious services or proselytizing” on library property.

With all the self-importance characteristic of the professional sports culture, a group of players and coaches with National Hockey League has unveiled a special television ad highlighting that the league’s stars would be happy to share the ice with talented homosexual hockey players.

More than 150 tornadoes ravaged the Midwest and South from February 28 to March 3, mostly in Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, and Alabama. The twisters — estimated to cost as much as $2 billion in insurance claims — caused 39 confirmed deaths and destroyed countless homes and buildings. But while the tornadoes left overwhelming loss in their wake, they also provided an opportunity for heroism and charity among the citizens.

Christian organizations continue to be assaulted on college campuses across the nation. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, a Christian club is suing the school after it ruled that the group isn’t religious and so must allow students of other faiths — or no faith — to join and even be in leadership if it wants to receive university recognition.

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