As many Catholic dioceses across America step up their efforts to protect the unborn and defend traditional marriage and family, Pope Benedict XVI (left)  is warning Catholic Church leaders to prepare for a protracted conflict against forces committed to a “radical secularism” which threatens not only the Christian faith, but the world as a whole.

After hundreds of thousands participated in the March for Life, while President Obama celebrated abortion on the 39th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, a new poll commissioned by the Knights of Columbus revealed that a whopping 79 percent of Americans are in favor of significantly restricting access to abortion. The numbers, largely unchanged from two years ago, also showed that more than half of Americans take what is considered by many activists to be a pro-life position.

Maryland’s Baltimore County is considering an ordinance that critics warn would allow transvestites, cross-dressers, and men confused about their gender to access women’s bathrooms, showers, and dressing rooms. Tom Quirk, the county council member who is sponsoring what he calls the “Act Concerning Human Relations” (Human Relations Bill No. 3-12), insisted that the measure is designed to address discrimination by employers based on an individual’s sexual orientation and gender identity. “It’s my strong belief that the only thing that should matter is someone’s qualifications for a job,” Quirk told the Columbia Patch, a local newspaper.

The 70-year-old Rabbinical Alliance of America has called upon Republican primary voters in South Carolina to reject the candidacy of Mitt Romney. The socially conservative organization — which represents more than 850 orthodox rabbis — is asking Christians in the state to bypass the former Massachusetts Governor on the ballot because of his stance against certain traditional values, specifically his support of the homosexual lifestyle as acceptable and normal behavior. 

prayingThe U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear a pair of cases involving the offering of prayers at county and school board meetings, continuing its decades-long tradition of steering clear of ruling on the supposed constitutionality of public prayers. According to BloombergNews.com, the High Court “hasn’t ruled on the constitutionality of prayer at government meetings since 1983, when the justices said lawmakers could begin sessions with nonsectarian prayers offered by a state-employed chaplain.”