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The Susan G. Komen Foundation — with B&H Publishing (a division of Lifeway Resources) — has published a theme Bible for cancer awareness. One dollar from the purchase of each Bible — entitled “Here’s Hope, Breast Cancer Awareness Bible” and paperbacked in Komen’s signature pink — will go to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the most widely known breast cancer organization in the United States. The Bible was released in October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Kathleen SebeliusPro-abortion groups expressed their anger over a decision by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (left) to keep the abortion pill Plan B from being sold over the counter to individuals under 17 years of age. Sebelius’ decision overruled an earlier decision by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which was “preparing to let the pill be sold without a prescription or age limit,” reported the Associated Press. Currently the pill, which pro-life leaders say can cause an abortion in women who have conceived, is only available over-the-counter to women over 17.

Tim TebowChristian quarterback for the Denver Broncos Tim Tebow has taken a lot of flak for his faith. Players from other teams, as well as fans, have openly mocked and ridiculed Tebow’s Christian beliefs, and even media outlets have taken jabs at his faith, albeit in mostly subtle ways. Still, Tebow has remained steadfast and has attracted the attention of fellow Christian Kurt Warner, a former quarterback for the New York Giants and St. Louis Rams, who has some advice for Tebow: Tone down the public displays of your faith.

Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota, has announced that it will cease performing abortions in December, becoming the first abortion clinic to close in the state in two decades. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported that “Regions is the last remaining hospital in the Twin Cities area that performs elective abortions…. Last year it performed 545 abortions, down from 902 a decade earlier.”

The decision by social workers in Cleveland, Ohio, to take a 200-pound third grader away from his mother and place him in foster care is raising concerns about how much power county and state social service agencies have to interfere in the lives of families.

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