A Home Depot in Okeechobee, Florida, exhibited clear bias against a Christian worker who refused to remove his button that read “One Nation under God, indivisible” from his apron. Trevor Keezor, who was working at Home Depot to earn money for college, states that he wore the button for over a year to show his support for his country, his brother who currently serves in the military, and for God.

lemonadeMultnomah County, Oregon, takes food safety seriously. When seven-year-old Julie Murphy opened a lemonade stand at a local fair, the county's inspectors asked if she had a license. Julie did not, and she was threatened with a $500 fine if she continued to sell lemonade without a license. Julie continued to sell lemonade until another county inspector approached her lemonade stand. Jeff Cogen, Multnomah County Chairman, later advised that this was not the best use of county resources and so allowed little Julie to continue to operate her lemonade stand.

Judge WalkerU.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn Walker on August 4 ruled against Proposition 8, a referendum passed by California voters in November 2008 that banned same-sex marriages in the state of California. According to the Judge, the ban violated the constitutional rights of gays and lesbians.

Though there is a slight dispute about the “oldest” family farm title going to the Shirley Plantation in Charles City, Virginia (founded in 1613 — up and running by 1638) or the Tuttle Farm in Dover, New Hampshire (begun in 1632, with Tuttle members running it ever since) – thanks to a recent Associated Press story there is no question that the Tuttle’s have now had enough.  

As individuals and families face tough economic times and uncertain futures, how have priorities shifted for Americans? A recent study by the Barna Group, a polling organization that researches the nation’s faith trends, offers some surprising — and potentially troubling — findings.