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Frank LombardWe all remember the infamous Duke University rape frame-up case, in which three white lacrosse players were falsely accused of raping a black female stripper. It was front-page news coast to coast, as it had all the elements of a mainstream-media cause célèbre: the perfect victim and the perfect villains, a “downtrodden” black woman of modest means and three “privileged” white college boys. Thus did the hard-left alliance of media, academia, and a Democrat prosecutor try its best to lynch the three, and if the stripper’s story hadn’t changed with the wind, the students could very well be sitting in prison currently.

pregnant womanI have been inveighing for so long against the hypocrisy of the “pro-choice” advocates, both in and out of government, that some people in my home state of New Hampshire have gotten the impression that I am a single-issue crusader.

Traveler helping othersThe concept of “paying it forward” — doing a good deed while asking only that the person helped would in turn help someone else — provided the motivation for a Good Samaritan in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to pay it all the way forward to Chicago, Illinois.

cover story for #2514For more than two centuries, freedom has been the catchword of Western Civilization. What began as an abstraction from the pens of Locke, Sidney, Montesquieu, Beccaria, and others has become, in the more than 230 years since the Declaration of Independence was signed and published to the world, an all-embracing pretext for political activity. Where rulers once justified their activities on the basis of discredited doctrines like the divine right of kings and the absolute and indivisible sovereignty said to inhere in the person of a monarch, governments of nearly every stripe today proclaim the sanctity of freedom.

1950s AmericaA well-used copy of Consumer Reports dated March 2009 caught my eye in the doctor’s reception area. The cover story: “Great old appliances.” Owners stood beside their still-operational refrigerators (1926), toasters (1936), mixers (1938), waffle irons (1939), dryers (1954), vacuum cleaners (1955), sewing machines (1957), blenders (1959) and dishwashers (1960). Even 40-somethings refused to ditch their “finds,” relegating more modern versions, bestowed by children or grandchildren, to the basement, unopened.

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