On November 16, 1798, Governor James Garrard of Kentucky signed into law the Kentucky Resolution of 1798, Thomas Jefferson's seminal restatement of the proper relationship between states and the federal government.

The fall of the Western Roman Empire was precipitated by immigrants — who had fled to Roman protection from the Huns — when the newcomers refused to follow Roman laws.

A look at the behind-the-scenes intrigue that catapulted unknown Wendell Willkie to head the Republican ticket in 1940 — and guaranteed FDR an unprecedented third term.

August 19, 2015 marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the German U-boat U-27 by the British Q-ship HMS Baralong — an infamous and barbaric act in which the British completely disregarded the Cruiser Rules of warfare.

Frederic Bastiat was born 214 years ago and his works continue to influence our approach to government abuses.

On June 20, 1787, Oliver Ellsworth warned against the dangers of a con-con and reminded delegates of the superiority of states.

On June 4, 1787, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention debated the number and the powers of the proposed president.

On June 3, 1781, Jack Jouett set out on a dangerous midnight ride to warn Thomas Jefferson of an impending British attempt to capture him.

June marks the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta in England, an important document in the history of American liberty.

Perhaps a fitting way to celebrate the anniversary of the founding of the Library of Congress is to take a few hours to read a few selections from the books our Founders read. (See the link to the book list at the end of this article!)

 

A fitting way to celebrate the anniversary of the founding of the Library of Congress is to read some selections from the books our Founders read. by Joe Wolverton, II, J.D.