The term of office and method of election of president changed drastically at the Convention of 1787.

Fifty years after "Peter and the Commissar" parodied central planning under the Soviet Union, would the themes still be laughable?

John Adams signed the Sedition Act 216 years ago this week. Have we learned nothing from that egregious violation of the Constitution?

An English admirer of America once described a different kind of American exceptionalism, one based on something far less common and more inspiring than an ability and willingness to use force against other nations to bend them to our will.

 

 

 

On July 5, 1787, James Madison warned against the discord that comes from compromise for its own sake.

There are many lessons for our current political situation to be learned from the colonial declarations of independence.

The United States would be wise to learn from the vengeful attacks on Aetolia carried out in 218 B.C. by Philip V of Macedon.

At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, James Madison remarkably supported giving the federal government power to nullify state laws.

During the first week of deliberations at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, delegates considered the critical issue of the future of the confederation.

Just as St. Guthlac used his belt to squeeze demons out of Ecgga, Americans can squeeze consolidation out of the federal government by applying the cinch of the Constitution.

Log in