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On June 4, 1787, delegates at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia considered the scope of the presidential veto power.

Prevailing wisdom holds that the United States had to use the bomb in order to save countless thousands of lives that the planned invasion would have cost. Yet Japan was ready to surrender many months earlier. So why was the bomb used?

Whatever his faults, Francisco Franco stood bravely against totalitarianism, saving Spain and hastening Axis defeat.

Almost since America’s founding, immigration has raised controversy. Though it has largely proven to be beneficial, there are real, legitimate concerns — especially now.

On November 16, 1798, Governor James Garrard of Kentucky signed into law the Kentucky Resolution of 1798, Thomas Jefferson's seminal restatement of the proper relationship between states and the federal government.

The fall of the Western Roman Empire was precipitated by immigrants — who had fled to Roman protection from the Huns — when the newcomers refused to follow Roman laws.

A look at the behind-the-scenes intrigue that catapulted unknown Wendell Willkie to head the Republican ticket in 1940 — and guaranteed FDR an unprecedented third term.

August 19, 2015 marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the German U-boat U-27 by the British Q-ship HMS Baralong — an infamous and barbaric act in which the British completely disregarded the Cruiser Rules of warfare.

Frederic Bastiat was born 214 years ago and his works continue to influence our approach to government abuses.