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Although the reviews on the new Captain America movie have been good, according to us afficiandoes of the Golden and Silver ages of comic books, it would be very strange, but very welcome, if Hollywood took the next logical step and made a second Captain America film which showed his fight against Communism. It was easy, during the Second World War, to create gruesome stereotypes of Nazi and Japanese military and political leaders. The brutality of Hitler and the horror of the Rape of Nanking were all too real. 

Totalitarians cannot tolerate the free exercise of religion. As so many disillusioned communists in the last century observed, communism, to its disciples, is a religion and a god. One well known book, a collection of the writings of a number of former communists, is called simply The God That Failed. Anyone who has attempted to discuss a subject intelligently with a communist quickly grasps that he is talking to a follower of a secular religion.

In 1919, America was still recovering from what was then called the Great World War (now referred to as the First World War). Inflation and the cost of living had increased much faster than wage growth. From 1913 to May of 1919, the cost of living had risen by 76 percent, while police wages had risen just 18 percent. Adding to the problem, soldiers returning from the war were flooding the labor market, putting downward pressure on workers’ earning power.

Not only have most Americans never heard of the Barbary Wars fought during Thomas Jefferson’s administration, but today’s schools don’t even bother to teach about them.

A July 4 Warning Against EmpireJohn Quincy Adams, Secretary of State in the administration of President James Monroe, offered a toast to his native America on July 4, 1821. The Republic was yet young, just 45 years after declaring its independence of Great Britain. The glories of its destiny were mainly to come. But the glories foreseen by Adams, the son of America’s second President and destined to be its sixth, were not triumphs of conquest, but rather the majesty of a nation leading truly by the force of example instead of the example of force.

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