FlagOn our first day in school, most of us stood beside our desk, put our little hand over our heart, and repeated (with varying degrees of accuracy) the words we know as the Pledge of Allegiance. As with anything we repeat daily and mostly from rote, we lose focus of the individual words and the deeper meaning behind them.

illuminatiType   “Illuminati” into an Internet search engine and you will wind up with an impossible aggregation too numerous and contradictory to be useful. A search on Ask.com yields 1.4 million entries, while the same at Google produces 12 million entries, and at Yahoo gives 33 million entries! A small percentage of these deal with genuine historical documents and reliable research by reputable scholars, but the vast majority, unfortunately, deal in fanciful fiction (of the sci-fi or mystery-action-adventure variety) or misinformation and deliberate disinformation posing as fact and serious scholarship.

American flagThe start of a baseball game, a football game, a NASCAR race, or a rodeo is predictable: crowds turn to face the American flag; men doff their hats; women put their hands on their hearts; and the “Star-Spangled Banner” is sung. And if you take your eyes from the flag for a few moments and look around, and at the same time listen, you may experience something rather profound. Whether clean-shaven or unshaven, whether yuppies or in boots and hats, whether holding children in their arms or apparently alone, Americans of all ages have tears forming in their eyes and catches in their throats as they sing and they stare at the American flag.

Iran and the ShahAmericans have been hearing for several years about potential war with Iran. For instance, on September 17, 2006, Time magazine reported, "The U.S. would have to consider military action long before Iran had an actual bomb." On October 10, under the heading "A Chilling Preview of War," Time warned: "As Iran continues to enrich uranium, the U.S. military has issued a 'Prepare to Deploy' order."

In the wake of President Obama’s $3.6 trillion budget and a series of bank and industry bailouts by the Federal Reserve, the specter of hyperinflation haunts the United States. There are plenty of historical examples of what hyperinflation can do to an economy. One need not necessarily look to 1920s Weimar Germany for an example; present-day Zimbabwe provides the most recent version of the economic wreckage caused by government planning that devalues a national currency. But Weimar Germany is instructive in that it illustrates the social, political, and cultural destruction caused by hyperinflation that leads to the loss of liberty; for it was Weimar Republic Germany that gave birth to the political success of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi movement.
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