Iran and the ShahAmericans have been hearing for several years about potential war with Iran. For instance, on September 17, 2006, Time magazine reported, "The U.S. would have to consider military action long before Iran had an actual bomb." On October 10, under the heading "A Chilling Preview of War," Time warned: "As Iran continues to enrich uranium, the U.S. military has issued a 'Prepare to Deploy' order."

In the wake of President Obama’s $3.6 trillion budget and a series of bank and industry bailouts by the Federal Reserve, the specter of hyperinflation haunts the United States. There are plenty of historical examples of what hyperinflation can do to an economy. One need not necessarily look to 1920s Weimar Germany for an example; present-day Zimbabwe provides the most recent version of the economic wreckage caused by government planning that devalues a national currency. But Weimar Germany is instructive in that it illustrates the social, political, and cultural destruction caused by hyperinflation that leads to the loss of liberty; for it was Weimar Republic Germany that gave birth to the political success of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi movement.

Founded by environmentalists in the late 1960s and officially initiated by Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970, at least one ecologist/activist who lays claim to being instrumental in creating that first official Earth Day has rather a dark and murderous past, and ties to present-day prominent politicians.

Kinsey Syndrome DVD coverThe Kinsey Syndrome, a DVD documentary about the "Father of the Sexual Revolution" and his research, relies on the investigative work of Dr. Judith Reisman as it examines Kinsey's methods, his supporters, and his legacy of lust.

Federal Reserve BuildingNearly all Americans know they are plagued by inflation. In 1962, a postage stamp cost four cents, a candy bar a nickel, a movie ticket 50 cents, and a pair of tennis shoes $5. A new imported Renault automobile cost $1,395, annual tuition at Harvard was $1,520, and the average cost of a new house $12,500. Over the last century, a dollar's purchasing power has declined over 95 percent — i.e., it won't buy what a nickel did in 1909.

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