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AlaskaGeorg Steller thought he was seeing a mirage. After weeks at sea on the frigid, storm-tossed waters of the north Pacific, Steller, along with his 70-odd shipmates on the Russian exploratory vessel the St. Peter, was beginning to despair of finding land. Weeks earlier, after years of arduous preparation that included the transport of men and equipment across the Siberian wilderness, the St. Peter, along with her sister ship, the St. Paul, had at last set off, under the direction of Danish captain Vitus Bering, from the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia’s almost-unexplored Far East in search of the northwestern coast of the American continent. Days earlier the two ships had become separated in bad weather and the St. Peter, low on water, food, and morale, had continued northeast into the unknown ocean.

"Yesterday," MSNBC reported on November 6, "Ron Paul’s campaign raised more than $4 million in a grassroots push tied to the Guy Fawkes plot to blow up the British Parliament in the 17th Century." The record online campaign haul that day stemmed from an effort developed by Paul’s always energetic grassroots supporters rather than by the campaign itself. As Paul pointed out on his Website two days later, the historic fundraising "event was created, organized, and run by volunteers."

Robert E. LeeGeneral Robert E. Lee knew the South had lost the war. He was also vividly aware that many, perhaps even most, of his troops were willing to continue the fight with vengeance, not victory, as the primary objective.

Walter DurantyUsing terror and famine, Josef Stalin murdered millions in the Ukraine. Walter Duranty, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, and the New York Times covered up the massacre.

Witchhunt? The high-profile cases cited by Senator Joseph McCarthy — Owen Lattimore, John Stewart Service, and Philip C. Jessup — all ended with the senator’s charges being validated.

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