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Two hundred and twenty-four years ago, on June 21, 1788, after three days of debate and by a final vote of 57-47, members of the New Hampshire convention voted to ratify the Constitution drafted the previous year in Philadelphia. With that historic vote, the Constitution was officially ratified, having been approved by the nine states — the number required by Article VII for the establishment of the Constitution.

Fifty years ago, on June 15, 1962, the radical left-wing SDS (Students for a Democratic Society) issued their Port Huron Statement opposing capitalism, eschewing American "ethnocentrism," promoting socialism, federal control of education, foreign aid, and surrendering our sovereignty to the United Nations — themes familiar to those who listen to our President today.

A quarter of a century ago President Ronald Reagan demanded that Gorbachev "tear down this wall," and the wall came down, but the legacy of socialist and communist influences is still felt strongly.

“¡Viva Cristo Rey!” (“Long Live Christ the King.”) That was the rallying cry for millions of Mexicans during the second and third decades of the 20th century, as revolutionary governments, modeled after the Bolshevik regime in Russia, unleashed round after round of persecution and terror throughout Mexico.

Two hundred years ago, President Madison presented a case for war against Britain in our nation's first declared war. Congress, though, not the President, made the decision: just as the Constitution requires. 

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