Fifty years ago, Rachel Carson published her book Silent Spring. The politically correct pseudo-science therein was largely responsible for the banning of DDT in much of the world, resulting in perhaps hundreds of millions of deaths.

September 19, 2012 marked the 216th anniversary of George Washington’s Farewell Address. Deservedly so, this speech has become renowned for its prose and principles — including national unity, tolerance of political differences, and neutrality in the endless foreign conflicts. To avoid the plague of perpetual war, Washington warns against “foreign alliances, attachments, and intrigues.” Sadly, our modern proclivity is to surrender sovereignty to international bodies whose members are not elected and thus not accountable to the American people, and to send monetary and military support to “freedom fighters” in the Middle East.

Seventy-five years ago, on September 21, 1937, the world received The Hobbit or There and Back Again, a strong and sweet message from one of the greatest Christian apologists in modern history, J.R.R. Tolkien. Much of the reason for the book's success is obvious: Tolkien was a fabulous writer; he was describing a mystical, but earthy world which preceded the rise of man; and the characters were drawn with a master’s touch of personality. The Hobbit has lost none of its allure over the last 75 years and it has been continuously in print since then.

In the 1920s, when Marxist-influenced politicians in Mexico virtually outlawed practicing the Christian religion, both priests and parishioners stood their ground.

Neil Armstrong was a quiet hero in an age of antiheroes. In an era that made cult heroes of amoral spies and cops who broke the rules, of James Bond and Dirty Harry Callahan, Neil Armstrong was the engineer who peacefully conquered a remote outpost of "the Last Frontier."