Today, August 25, the predecessor of another Marxist regime celebrates its 100th anniversary.The Kuomintang, or Chinese Nationalist Party, has uniformly been given a bad reputation in academic communities and its members are invariably portrayed in films or novels as “corrupt” and “incompetent gangsters.” The Kuomintang, or “Party of the People,” was certainly imperfect, but then so are all political parties and all governments. A more pertinent question is how does the Party of the People stack up against other Chinese governments? A century ago, China had real hope. 

Two hundred years ago today — during the War of 1812 — perhaps the most storied vessel in the U.S. Navy, the Constitution, earned her nickname Old Ironsides when cannonballs from the British warship Guerriere bounced off her hull.

U.S. Secretary of State John Hay called the Spanish-American War of 1898 a “splendid little war.” Superficially, the description seemed apt. The war lasted less than four months; our fighting forces distinguished themselves with valor; and the United States, acquiring territory from Puerto Rico to the Philippines, emerged as a “world power.” However, behind victory’s fervor lay deceptions, and principles of the Founding Fathers were discarded, portending future misery for Americans.

Seventy-five years ago, on August 5, 1937, one of the most horrific — and most ignored — episodes in human history began. “Operation Kulak” ("kulak" meaning rich peasants) was the Soviet Union’s effort to repress those farmers who had a little more than other farmers (according, at least, to the definitions of the Communist Party), and who resisted collectivization.

Twenty-five years ago this month, the Federal Communications Commission ended the “Fairness Doctrine,” which in the name of "fairness" infringed on the freedom of speech of radio and television stations, in violation of the First Amendment.