Two hundred years ago, President Madison presented a case for war against Britain in our nation's first declared war. Congress, though, not the President, made the decision: just as the Constitution requires. 

“Duty, Honor, Country,” Douglas MacArthur solemnly intoned in 1962 to the cadets at West Point , invoking the three words that summed up the cadets’ calling. On that occasion, MacArthur shared his understanding of the West Point motto in language so moving and eloquent that, according to at least one observer, "there wasn't a dry eye in the place" and you could "visualize exactly what he was talking about" — and almost hear and feel it.

What did "Duty, Honor, Country" mean to MacArthur during his long military career? What should those three hallowed words mean to us today?

On May 15, 1862, Lincoln created the Department of Agriculture, or what he called the "People's Department."  Similar special interest federal agencies have followed in its wake.

Fifty years ago, on May 12, 1962, Douglas MacArthur bade farewell to the cadets at West Point, an academy that he attended and graduated first in his class. In his final roll call with the cadets, he reminded them about "Duty, Honor, Country" — hallowed words that define what all future military officers should aspire to be and what MacArthur was.

Airship travel was a big success, until that fateful day in Lakehurst, New Jersey, May 6, 1937, when the Hindenburg met her fate.