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On the first Thanksgiving Day, the Pilgrims began a custom of placing five grains of corn at the table so that the reason for their rejoicing might not be forgotten. Five grains of corn was the daily ration during those desperate days before the harvest when food was scarcely to be had.

Although many holidays have broad international appeal, Thanksgiving — arguably America’s second-favorite holiday after Christmas — is celebrated only in the United States and Canada. What originated as a sort of harvest festival among British colonists in the New World has taken on a life of its own. No longer is Thanksgiving a mere celebration of the harvest (a ritual found in many cultures); it has become a symbol of the oft-neglected virtue of gratitude.

President Obama has awarded this year's Presidential Medals of Freedom, and among the honorees were aggressive abortion advocate Gloria Steinem.

A Tennessee parent was arrested when he showed up at his children's school and insisted on walking them home — in violation of a new school district mandate.

Whether Oswald was, in fact, the lone killer of President John F. Kennedy, part of a conspiracy, and/or the fall guy or "patsy" he claimed to be, there remain half a century later a number of unanswered questions that the Warren Commission either ignored or glossed over.

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