The Charlotte, North Carolina, police department has made it clear that Jesus is not welcome at its functions. According to the Associated Press, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) has informed its volunteer chaplains that they are not to mention Jesus’ name when they pray at official ceremonies. The Charlotte Observer reported that the new policy was announced by the head of the department’s volunteer chaplain program, Major John Diggs, who explained that the goal was to make sure the chaplains were sensitive to the variety of religions practiced by the department’s more than 2,000 employees. “This is not in any way an effort to demean anybody’s Christian beliefs,” Diggs assured. “It’s to show respect for all the religious practices in our organization. CMPD is not anybody’s church.”

Sixty-six members of Congress have penned a letter to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta asking him to address what they say is an “alarming pattern of attacks on faith in the Air Force.” According to the Air Force Times, the congressmen blame Air Force Chief of Staff Norman Schwartz for cultivating the attack on religious expression, which they say includes removing Latin references to God in an Air Force unit logo, deleting Christian references from a missile training course, taking Bibles off an Air Force accommodations checklist, and prohibiting commanders from informing Air Force service members about Chaplain Corps programs.

A viral YouTube video showing a 68-year-old bus monitor in New York being verbally abused by students on the bus has resulted in a touching response by tens of thousands of well-wishers. The ten-minute video shows Karen Klein, a grandmother of eight who rides along on a bus serving Greece Central School District near Rochester, N.Y., being bullied and berated by a group of foul-mouthed students on the bus.

Two of Illinois’ top government attorneys charged with the responsibility of defending the state’s laws have balked at defending the state’s marriage protection statute from a lawsuit filed by 25 homosexual couples. The Associated Press reported that Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan and Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez “have refused to defend the 16-year-old ban, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman, saying it violates the state constitution’s equal protection clause.”

Two hundred and twenty-four years ago, on June 21, 1788, after three days of debate and by a final vote of 57-47, members of the New Hampshire convention voted to ratify the Constitution drafted the previous year in Philadelphia. With that historic vote, the Constitution was officially ratified, having been approved by the nine states — the number required by Article VII for the establishment of the Constitution.

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