Christian organizations continue to be assaulted on college campuses across the nation. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, a Christian club is suing the school after it ruled that the group isn’t religious and so must allow students of other faiths — or no faith — to join and even be in leadership if it wants to receive university recognition.

Florida Governor Rick Scott is expected to sign a bill allowing students and others to offer “inspirational messages” at public-school events. State law already allows students to engage in two minutes of silent prayer or meditation at the beginning of the school day, but S.B. 98, passed March 1 by the state legislature, would broaden the religious landscape at schools, allowing students to make short inspirational speeches or offer prayers at non-compulsory school events.

President Terry O’Neil (left) of the National Organization of Women announced on March 1:  “The bishops have not been able to convince Catholic women to not take birth control. We know this because 98 percent of sexually active [Catholic] women take birth control at some point in their lives — just like 98 percent of sexually active non-Catholic women take birth control at some point in their lives. So the bishops have failed and the evangelical preachers that don’t want their women to take birth control — they have failed.”

A Christian pastor who tried to encourage Muslims to leave Islam will receive $100,000 in damages from Dearborn, Michigan, which tried to stop him from evangelizing at the city’s Arab-American Festival.

The state of Texas finds itself in a battle with the Obama administration over its decision to defund Planned Parenthood, the nation’s premier abortion provider. “At the direction of lawmakers and Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott,” reported the Texas Tribune, “the Texas Health and Human Services commissioner signed a rule [February 23] that formally bans Planned Parenthood clinics and other ‘affiliates of abortion providers’” from participating in the Texas Women’s Health Program (WHP), which provides a variety of health services to low-income women throughout the state, including “family planning.” Planned Parenthood had confirmed that it was providing some 40 percent of the services offered through WHP.

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