A July 4 Warning Against EmpireJohn Quincy Adams, Secretary of State in the administration of President James Monroe, offered a toast to his native America on July 4, 1821. The Republic was yet young, just 45 years after declaring its independence of Great Britain. The glories of its destiny were mainly to come. But the glories foreseen by Adams, the son of America’s second President and destined to be its sixth, were not triumphs of conquest, but rather the majesty of a nation leading truly by the force of example instead of the example of force.

Columbus, Ohio hosted the first We the People Convention this weekend, attracting nearly one thousand pro-liberty, anti-Obama and anti-establishment guests. The event boasted an array of prominent speakers, including Republican hopeful Herman Cain, former Democratic strategist Dick Morris, and John Birch Society President John McManus.

According to the event’s website, the event’s purpose was to “educate and train citizens about the political process and to encourage involvement in that process at the grassroots level.” For two days, from July 1 to July 2, the convention hosted educational breakout sessions that included a wide range of conservative speakers.

In an effort to bring nonbelievers together and increase the visibility of atheists, the Freedom From Religion Foundation displayed “Good without God” billboards across the nation. Unfortunately for the organization, one of the billboards was placed on church property in Ohio prompting complaints from the church's pastor and ultimately, the removal of the billboard.

Indiana has recently passed a pro-life reform bill, which contains abortion limits and revokes funding for Planned Parenthood. Predictably, it has incurred outrage from Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and other related groups.

Jay Sekulow (left), Chief Counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice, stated:

Homosexual activists and sympathizers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) want their agency’s “gay” awareness training to be expanded government wide, according to a report in the Washington Times. Officials at the USDA have asked the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), which supervises policies for federal employees, to mandate that all departments of the federal government implement its sensitivity training, according to a USDA internal newsletter.