Larry GreenleySince its inception more than 50 years ago, The John Birch Society has always been right in the middle of all of the important political battles. In the past year, the JBS has taken on issues as serious and challenging as championing ObamaCare nullification at the state level, as well as opposing the latest unconstitutional actions from Congress. Larry Greenley, the director of marketing for the JBS, spoke with The New American (TNA) about the Society’s major grass-roots activities this year.

Hollywood superstar couple Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt , who have vowed that they won’t wed until gay marriage is legal, aren’t exactly the poster children for Middle American family values.

But conservatives may find their views on K-12 education forthright and refreshing.

Even in peacetime, government lies are so commonplace as to hardly be news. During wartime, however, the government fib fabricator goes into overdrive — as does the coverup machinery. Decades may pass before wartime lies are exposed, and even more time may elapse before the government admits to having deceived the public.

Seventy clergy with the United Methodist Church (UMC) in Minnesota have signed a statement saying that they would “offer the grace of the Church’s blessing” to same-sex couples, reported the United Methodist News Service.

Speaking during the UMC’s annual state denominational conference, the Rev. Bruce Robbins (left), pastor of the Hennepin Avenue United Methodist Church in Minneapolis, said that clergy groups had been meeting “who want to challenge parts of the United Methodist polity with which we disagree — that which relates to the lesbian, gay, transgender, and bisexual community and Christian marriage.” Robbins said the issue had gained importance with the “possibility of a constitutional amendment in the state of Minnesota” that would define marriage as only between a man and a woman.

James Arness, the legendary actor known to several generations of TV viewers as Marshall Matt Dillon of Dodge City, Kansas, in the 20-year-long series Gunsmoke, died of heart failure on June 3 at his home in Los Angeles. Arness, who was born James King Aurness in Minneapolis in 1923, was 88 years old. His younger brother, actor Peter Graves, best known for his role on Mission: Impossible, and for his earlier role in the series, Fury, died last year.