Robert WelchIn 1914, when the Old World was at war, the New, unaware of the designs of its political and financial leaders, expected to stay out of the latest European upheaval. American public opinion was firmly opposed to violating in any way our neutral posture, which meant that America’s young men were still graduating from high school, going to college, and finding gainful employment. One such crop of optimistic youth was enduring a philosophy class at the University of North Carolina, an exercise in sophistry taught by the venerable but insufferable Horace Williams. Professor Williams’ class, we may imagine, was typical for the time: a couple dozen well-groomed young men and a few young women sitting at buckling wooden desks made in the previous century, trying to grasp the contradictory axioms imparted by the tweedy, subversive Williams.

With the federal deficit edging towards $15 trillion, one wonders where federal officials found $2 million to fund a research project in Texas that will photograph students’ lunch trays before they sit down to eat and later photograph the leftovers.

According to The Blaze, the computer program that takes the photographs “analyzes the photos to identify every piece of food on the plate — right down to how many ounces are left in that lump of mash potatoes —and calculates the number of calories each student scarfed down.”

Parents in Tucson, Arizona, are beyond disgruntled over the content of a anti-capitalist, anti-American textbook used in an ethnic studies curriculum for grades 3–12. At a Tucson board meeting on May 10 (picture, left and video below), parents articulated their anger over the curriculum’s content, and read aloud excerpts from the controversial book.

On Tuesday, the Louisville-based Presbyterian Church (USA) — the largest Presbyterian denomination in the country — ruled that it will ordain homosexual men and women, and also ratified a proposal that removes the celibacy requirement for unmarried clergy. According to The Blaze, the decision is the “latest mainline Protestant move toward accepting gay relationships.”

Though the U.S. Navy just announced last month that it would allow its chaplains to perform same-sex unions, late last night it halted that decision until later this year — bowing to pressure from 63 U.S. Representatives.