A pro-life official with Susan G. Komen for the Cure has resigned her position after the cancer charity was pressured into rescinding its decision to stop funding the abortion giant Planned Parenthood.

A British counselor who was censured by the UK’s top professional psychotherapy association for agreeing to help a man leave the homosexual lifestyle has received the backing of high-ranking officials from one of the nation’s most venerable institutions: the Church of England.

A team of conservative legal advocacy groups has come to the aid of pro-life pregnancy centers in Austin, Texas, which continue to be harassed by city ordinances making it difficult for them to help women choose life for their babies.

Late last year the city of Austin abandoned an ordinance it had passed requiring crisis pregnancy centers to post signs stipulating that they do not perform abortions or prescribe emergency birth control such as the morning-after abortion pill. But now the city council has implemented a new ordinance which omits the words “abortion” and “birth control,” but still requires the pro-life centers to stipulate whether or not they offer medical services under the direction of a licensed health-care provider.

The story sounds like something out of 1960s Nashville, when diners were thrown out of restaurants by managers and owners who didn’t like the color of their skin. Only in this case it’s 2012, the town is Knoxville, Tennessee, and the manager of the restaurant — a little place called the Bistro at the Bijou — didn’t care for the views the patron, Republican State Senator Stacey Campfield (left), has on homosexuality.

Algerian flagAlgeria — just west of Libya in northwest Africa — has been part of the civilized world since before Christ. In ancient times, it was first associated with the colonies of Phoenicians who, in competition with Greek colonists from various cities, founded cities along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Carthage was such a city in what is present-day Tunisia (between Algeria and Libya), and the Punic Wars of the late Roman Republic were a battle to the death between the two great powers of Carthage and Rome, one of which would dominate the Mediterranean Sea.

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