Legal action by the ACLU has prompted a school district in White County, Tennessee, to ban the Gideons from distributing their Bibles to students in classrooms. According to the Tennessean newspaper, members of a local chapter of the Gideons, an international Bible distribution organization headquartered in Nashville, “came into the classroom, and students were invited up to get a Bible if they wanted one.” The paper reported that one student “said she didn’t want to take [a Bible] but felt pressured to do so. Her mother later complained to school officials and then to the ACLU….”

One of the nation’s leading home school groups is urging the Department of Defense (DOD) to change its policy on how many home schooled recruits are allowed into the armed forces. Since 1998 the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) “has been working with Congress and the Department of Defense to extend ‘Tier 1’ status — the military’s highest enlistment option — to home schoolers,” reported CBN News.

Robert WelchIn 1914, when the Old World was at war, the New, unaware of the designs of its political and financial leaders, expected to stay out of the latest European upheaval. American public opinion was firmly opposed to violating in any way our neutral posture, which meant that America’s young men were still graduating from high school, going to college, and finding gainful employment. One such crop of optimistic youth was enduring a philosophy class at the University of North Carolina, an exercise in sophistry taught by the venerable but insufferable Horace Williams. Professor Williams’ class, we may imagine, was typical for the time: a couple dozen well-groomed young men and a few young women sitting at buckling wooden desks made in the previous century, trying to grasp the contradictory axioms imparted by the tweedy, subversive Williams.

With the federal deficit edging towards $15 trillion, one wonders where federal officials found $2 million to fund a research project in Texas that will photograph students’ lunch trays before they sit down to eat and later photograph the leftovers.

According to The Blaze, the computer program that takes the photographs “analyzes the photos to identify every piece of food on the plate — right down to how many ounces are left in that lump of mash potatoes —and calculates the number of calories each student scarfed down.”

Parents in Tucson, Arizona, are beyond disgruntled over the content of a anti-capitalist, anti-American textbook used in an ethnic studies curriculum for grades 3–12. At a Tucson board meeting on May 10 (picture, left and video below), parents articulated their anger over the curriculum’s content, and read aloud excerpts from the controversial book.