On Monday, May 2, John Birch Society President Jack McManus spoke at the Marriott Hotel in Colonie, New York to an audience of 400 people. His speech focused on the “Betrayal of the Constitution” and targeted what McManus has dubbed "the neoconservative agenda.”

Prior to the start of his speech, McManus told a group of supporters, “Conservative vs. liberal is meaningless. You’re either for the Constitution or not. At The John Birch Society, we don’t call ourselves conservatives. We call ourselves constitutionalists.”

It's happened again. Another Muslim man. Another dead Muslim daughter. For honor.

The Minnesota legislature appears to be closer than ever to passing a state constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman. On April 29, barely a week after a bill was introduced in the Republican-controlled State Senate, the bill passed out of committee, moving the proposed amendment a step closer to being placed on the 2012 ballot in the state, where a survey by the conservative Minnesota Family Council shows that 56 percent of voters think marriage should be defined as only between a man and a woman.

Questions about President Obama’s ever-changing narrative on Osama bin Laden’s reported assassination and rampant speculation that at least some Pakistani officials may have been involved in hiding the terrorist leader have been swirling around the internet in recent days. But there’s another important angle that has received less attention: Assuming bin Laden really was killed over the weekend — his death has been reported on numerous occasions by credible sources since 2001 — how could it take so long for the most powerful governments in the world to find one man?

American Indians are on the warpath to protest the code name used during the operation to kill Osama bin Laden. U.S. operatives used "Geronimo," a reference to the 19th-century Chiracahua Apache (pictured, left) who died in captivity in 1909 after a life spent fighting Mexicans and Americans.