Culture

Congressman Lawrence McDonald had served as a medical doctor, an officer in the U.S. Navy, a U.S. Representative from Georgia, and the second leader of The John Birch Society before being invited (along with several other members of Congress) to attend a celebration of the 30th anniversary of the signing of the United States–South Korea Mutual Defense Treaty in Seoul. McDonald was aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 en route to the event when the plane was shot down by a Soviet fighter jet — 27 years ago — on September 1, 1983. Although history has all but forgotten Larry McDonald and the sacrifice he made for this country and freedom, we here at The New American have not forgotten and never will.

Glenn Beck’s August 28 Restoring Honor rally at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial confirmed that oft-used infamous quote from Field of Dreams, “If you build it, they will come.” And after Beck worked tirelessly for the past year to create the awe-inspiring event, come they surely did! While there is no official estimate on the number of attendees of the D.C. rally as of yet, estimates range from 300,000 to 1 million people.

dictionaryThe linguistic relativity principle is back in vogue, according to linguist Guy Deutscher of the University of Manchester, writing for the New York Times. This principle, often known informally as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis after the two linguists who articulated it most persuasively, states in effect that the way in which different languages encode various grammatical properties determines the way their speakers perceive the world.

studentsFor over 30 years the middle school in Nettleton, Mississippi, had classified students who wished to run in student elections by race. One year particular offices, such as class president, were reserved for white students; the next year they were opened only to blacks. This policy was implemented, said the school district, in response to a court order, likely involving a desegregation case.

This week, the New York Post exposed the religious bias found within the New York State Regents exams. According to the Post, “State testmakers played favorites when quizzing high-schoolers on world religions — giving Islam and Buddhism the kid-glove treatment while socking it to Christianity.” The bias was found in specifically global history and geography exams, proving yet again that the liberal tenet of separation of church and state applies solely to Christianity.�

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