Osama bin LadenThe popular narrative surrounding the life of Osama bin Laden is filled with questions, intrigue, and misinformation. Though he ultimately became one of the most loathed figures in the American psyche, it’s important to remember that bin Laden was once a good friend of the U.S. government. In many ways, he can even be considered a creation of American officials and their allies. His Mujahedeen, or Islamic warriors, were even armed, trained, supplied and financed by America and some of its allies.

American Indians are on the warpath to protest the code name used during the operation to kill Osama bin Laden. U.S. operatives used "Geronimo," a reference to the 19th-century Chiracahua Apache (pictured, left) who died in captivity in 1909 after a life spent fighting Mexicans and Americans.

Questions about President Obama’s ever-changing narrative on Osama bin Laden’s reported assassination and rampant speculation that at least some Pakistani officials may have been involved in hiding the terrorist leader have been swirling around the internet in recent days. But there’s another important angle that has received less attention: Assuming bin Laden really was killed over the weekend — his death has been reported on numerous occasions by credible sources since 2001 — how could it take so long for the most powerful governments in the world to find one man?

A ban on public funding for religious organizations, written into Florida’s constitution in the 1880s, would be repealed under a bill now before the state’s legislature. The Associated Press reported that the bill, HJR 1471, won approval in the state House on April 27, but its companion measure, SB 1218, was stalled in the state Senate.

tornado damageThe devastation is still being calculated from last week’s gigantic storm system that spawned numerous tornadoes spanning several states. With 337 confirmed deaths, the violent event is being called the nation’s deadliest tornado disaster in 86 years, and the second deadliest in American history.