Culture

Pardon me, but if I hear one more time that we can’t deport 12 million illegal aliens I’m headed for the backyard to howl at the moon. Is the American memory so short that we’ve already forgotten the 1950s? This writer is old enough to remember very clearly the mass deportation of illegal aliens that occurred in 1954 in what was officially termed “Operation Wetback” (prior to the age of political correctness).

Like millions of other baseball fans, I vividly remember the sights and sounds of the first big league game I attended. The journey began early on a Sunday morning with a two-hour train ride from Wallingford, Connecticut, my hometown, to New York City, the capital of the universe. I was ten years old at the time and was making the trip in the company of an adult cousin and his son, a boy of about my age. It was only my second trip to the big city, the first having been a year earlier when I accompanied an aunt and one of her friends on a sightseeing trip, visiting attractions like the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building. But this trip was even more special. This was a trip to Yankee Stadium.

pregnantImagine a crisis pregnancy center, whose very purpose is to counsel pregnant women to preserve their unborn babies’ lives, representing itself as an abortion clinic. Hard to imagine, isn’t it?

Now that we are done with three days celebrating — or at least (more or less) observing — Independence Day with cookouts, fireworks, trips to the beach, and possibly even a thought or two about our independence from Great Britain, it might be a good time to turn our minds, however briefly, across "the pond" to jolly old (well, old anyway) England and remember a man who lost his head on this date 475 years ago.

Once upon a time, in a country half a century away, obscenity laws were enforced, parents forbade their kids (especially girls) to date until they were 16, sex was an intimate and private matter, schools emphasized academics and good manners, modesty and humility were virtues, and children were protected from disturbing and violent materials.

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