Thomas JeffersonOf George Wythe, his former tutor and mentor, Thomas Jefferson once wrote: “No man ever left behind him a character more venerated than George Wythe. His virtue was of the purest tint; his integrity inflexible, and his justice exact; of warm patriotism, and devoted as he was to liberty and the natural and equal rights of man, he might truly be called the Cato of his country.”

When Edwin Newman published his phenomenal bestseller Strictly Speaking, a blurb on the back cover quoted a reviewer who described the erudite author as "a glass of chilled wine awash in a sea of tepid Tab." That is probably the greatest tribute to the surpassing virtue of verbal wheat over rhetorical chaff since Thomas Jefferson said the words of Jesus stand out from those of his commentators like so many "diamonds in a dung heap."

In New Jersey, a program called “Teach for America” is being tested as a tool for addressing the manifest failure of public schools in areas like Newark. This program purports to improve schools by providing them with leadership through this foundation, which combines teaching and administration.

The American Rifleman

“When the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised by an artful man, who was governor of Pennsylvania, to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually.” — George Mason of Virginia, 1788

Congressman Lawrence McDonald had served as a medical doctor, an officer in the U.S. Navy, a U.S. Representative from Georgia, and the chairman of The John Birch Society before being invited (along with several other members of Congress) to attend a celebration of the 30th anniversary of the signing of the United States–South Korea Mutual Defense Treaty in Seoul. McDonald was aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 en route to the event when the plane was shot down by a Soviet fighter jet — 27 years ago — on September 1, 1983. Although history has all but forgotten Larry McDonald and the sacrifice he made for this country and freedom, we here at The New American have not forgotten and never will.