UMC logoA group of 33 retired bishops with the United Methodist Church (UMC) have released a statement calling their denomination to drop its ban on homosexual clergy. The bishops are asking the church to remove from its official Book of Discipline the stricture stating that the “practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching” and that “self-avowed practicing homosexuals are not to be certified as candidates, ordained as ministers, or appointed to serve in The United Methodist Church.”

A new study from a youth research organization finds that even amidst a culture in which an aggressive media encourages teens to become sexually active, a solid majority still want to embrace traditional values regarding sex. According to the latest research by OneHope, a Christian youth outreach that provides research to non-profit organizations, 61 percent of American teens want to remain abstinent until marriage, with an additional 63 percent saying that while they have already been sexually active, they would like to return to a place of sexual purity.

When Iraqi immigrant Faleh Almaleki ran down and killed his daughter Noor, using his Jeep Grand Cherokee as a weapon, the mainstream media (with the exception of Fox News) ignored it entirely.

fighting tigersHaving grown up during the years following World War II, it never fails to surprise me how little most people who haven’t reached their mid-60s know of that epic conflict, especially the Pacific Theater. During the 1950s, we did not have to be formally taught about World War II — it was a topic in everyone’s home. Every family had a veteran or two or had lost a son. War movies were regular fare at our local theater. The first series I watched on television was the incomparable Victory at Sea. The documentary footage, the music, and the narration — both the script and the delivery by Leonard Graves — penetrated into my heart and soul and have never left. It seemed that a new book on the war came out every week, and newspapers and magazines were full of articles about the war.

The Kentucky state legislature is currently considering legislation that would add religion classes to the public school curriculum. On Tuesday, the state Senate Education Committee approved Senate Bill 56, which allows public schools to teach Bible courses as electives. It currently awaits approval in the House.