I recently attended a "meet and greet" in my city with U.S Rep. Paul Hodes (D-NH) who is a candidate for U. S. Senate this year. The Congressman talked about a great many things: healthcare, the wars, education, the deficits, and mounting national debt among them. One thing that stands out in my memory, however, is his pledge to be "100 percent pro-choice."

For those who had not noticed, Mary Daly died last Friday. Daly was a feminist theologian who taught for 35 years at Jesuit-run Boston College in Massachusetts. She was, it seems safe to say, the Boston Globe's kind of Catholic.

Great legends are often built on the ashes of someone's destruction — whether figurative or literal. Competition is often a zero-sum game. One man's moment of triumph is another's devastating defeat. Bobby Thomson hit the home run that made him forever famous, the "shot heard around the world" in the ninth inning of the final playoff game, the home run that won the pennant for the New York Giants and sent the Brooklyn Dodgers home for a long and bitter winter. But Ralph Branca, the Dodger pitcher who surrendered that home run, was forever marked as a loser. The world must seem merciless to a man who was one of the best pitchers in the game of Major League Baseball, but must go through life labeled a "loser" because of one pitch in the ultimate game of a fabled season.

John ColterThe sinewy, bearded man raced up the brushy hillside, blood streaming from his nose from the terrific exertion. He did not consider himself a fast runner, but on this occasion the terror of sudden and agonizing death lent wings to his feet.

proseutionLiberals rightly criticize America’s high rate of incarceration. Claiming to be the freest country on Earth, the United States incarcerates a larger percentage of its population than Iran or Syria. Over two million people, or nearly one in 50 adults, excluding the elderly, are incarcerated, the highest proportion in the world. Some seven million Americans, or 3.2 percent, are under penal supervision.