Tim TebowIn the world of Super Bowl advertising, there is one apparent guiding principle: Almost anything goes, as long as it is more entertaining than the actual game, and as long as it doesn’t enter the arena of faith or cross a pre-determined and secularly rigid ideological line. The rule of thumb seems to be that sex and sophomoric humor sell and are, thus, overwhelmingly welcome on Super Bowl Sunday. By contrast, advertisers must never consider challenging viewers to raise their perspectives above the sensual and bawdy to thoughts that are truly noble and good.

March for LifeHundreds of thousands of participants flooded the nation’s capital January 22 to pray for an end to abortion, and remember the 50 million babies lost in the 37 years since the U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision.

Right to LifeJanuary 22 marks a tragic and somber milestone as millions of Americans across the nation observe the anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which opened the door to legalized abortion and has resulted in the deaths of nearly 50 million pre-born babies over the last 37 years.

DietrichForty-five years ago, former SS troops gathered by the thousands. Old friends emerged from self-inflicted obscurity. Many, intent on still concealing their less-than-positive one-time career pursuits, joined comrades-in-arms unfazed by the bloody legacy they splattered on the pages of history. They were Adolf Hitler’s elite personal security who took an oath to their Fuhrer rather than to their country.

It wasn’t just Oval Office tape recordings that Richard Nixon wanted to get rid of. According to documents made public last week, the 37th president ordered the removal of pieces of modern art placed in embassies during the Kennedy administration. Calling such pieces “little uglies,” on January 26, 1970 Nixon issued a memo calling the examples of modern art and architecture in government offices “incredibly atrocious.”