Culture

Warsaw Ghetto uprisingA premonition of death hovered over the medieval section of Warsaw. Surrounded by a 10-foot wall of brick and barbed wire, the most run-down section of Poland’s capital was packed with some 500,000 Jews, nearly 10 times the number of people it originally housed. The time was October 1940, and the curtain had descended upon the Jews in Nazi-occupied Warsaw.

Traveler helping othersThe concept of “paying it forward” — doing a good deed while asking only that the person helped would in turn help someone else — provided the motivation for a Good Samaritan in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to pay it all the way forward to Chicago, Illinois.

New York Times signThe New York Times may have a reputation as America’s premiere newspaper, but it also has a well-deserved reputation among informed Americans as a flunky for every big-government scheme that ever came down the pike. Moreover, New York Times' reporters on the scene in Russia and Cuba repeatedy put out false stories benefiting Stalin and Castro, two of the most tyrannical dictators of modern times.

teacher with no studentsIn this age of budget woes and bailouts, it may surprise some to hear that governments are paying workers to do nothing. Yet that is exactly what is happening in New York City, where hundreds of school teachers accused of misconduct — sometimes the sexual variety — are receiving upwards of $70,000 annually to wile away time in "temporary reassingment centers," with taxpayers footing the bill to the tune of $65 million a year. Karen Matthews of the Associated Press reports:

Yehuda BielskiWhen Germany invaded Poland in WWII, the Polish Jews that the Germans did not immediately kill were jammed in ghettos, there to await their execution by the Nazi SS. Though the ghettos were closely guarded to prevent the escape of Jews, some Jews risked facing an immediate date with a firing squad and escaped. For the escapees, sanctuary of a sort often lay just a short distance from the ghettos — in the forests of Poland.

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