resumeWith the announcement from Gallup that the unemployment rate had dropped precipitously in early October to 8.3 percent came the disclaimer that they could be wrong. Chief Economist Dennis Jacobe wrote that “the sharp drop in Gallup’s unemployment and underemployment rates may partly result from seasonal factors. Halloween has become the third-largest sales season for many retailers, who are likely increasing their staffing accordingly. In addition, some stores may have been minimally staffed and are beginning early to add employees for the holidays.”  But it also “means it could be something of an aberration that will dissipate during the weeks ahead ... but for now, this job market improvement appears real.”

The press release from the Boston Consulting Group signaled the beginning of the American renaissance in manufacturing as cost advantages of China are fading rapidly and companies are beginning to repatriate their jobs back home. There are seven industrial sectors that could create two to three million jobs over the next five years as American manufacturers do the new math. As explained by Harold Sirkin, one of the three authors of Made in American, Again: "A surprising amount of work that rushed to China over the past decade could soon start to come back — and the economic impact could be significant. We’re on record predicting a U.S. manufacturing renaissance starting by around 2015."

On September 30, the Economic Cycle Research Institute announced that the U.S. economy officially entered a new recession. On the following Tuesday, October 4, the Standard and Poor’s 500 Index dropped to 1,074.77, the lowest level of the year.

As talk of another possible extension of unemployment benefits is making its way through Washington, the New York Times recently covered a story on Dan Tolleson (left), a writer with a Ph.D. in politics who has only been able to find short-term work since July of 2009. What fascinated the Times, and likely a number of readers, was the notion that though Tolleson has been unemployed for a lengthy period of time, he stands opposed to an extension of unemployment benefits.

Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain’s popularity in numerous polls is increasing daily, and while the former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza may portray himself as a principled conservative, an analysis of his campaign positions, especially his most controversial flat tax proposal, reveals serious concerns with Cain’s commitment to fiscal conservatism.

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