The latest study by The Pew Center on the States shows not only that states have not funded the promises they made to their employees when they retire, but that the gap between those promises and the states' contributions to pay for those promises is widening.

EconomyEdwin Vieira, Jr. is an attorney who has won three cases before the Supreme Court of the United States. He earned four degrees from Harvard University, including his doctorate.  A popular speaker, he is also the author of the monumental two-volume survey of monetary history in our nation entitled Pieces of Eight.  He resides in Virginia.  The following interview was conducted by John F. McManus, publisher of The New American.

The price of one ounce of gold exceeded $1,500 yesterday, and immediately the media was filled with explanations. Jan Harvey, writing for Reuters, said gold was benefiting from “the threat of a downgrade to the United States’ triple-A credit rating this week and fresh worries over euro zone debt [that] fueled fears over the outlook for both the dollar and the euro.”

When the federal government took over General Motors in July of 2009, it was “the only way to avoid an economic calamity,” according to President Obama.

Stuffed full of $50 billion of taxpayers’ money, GM began to revive, a little. It had lost an amazing $103 billion over the previous five years, partly by acceding to union demands for generous compensation packages (including payments to workers even when the plants where they worked weren’t even running!), and partly by misreading market conditions and their competition.

Each year, American taxpayers lose anywhere from 20 to 50 percent of their income to the federal and state government in taxes, with the additional cost of filing taxes averaging approximately $20 billion annually. However, those figures pale in comparison to the 20 shocking tax-related facts put together by Business Insider, ones that will reportedly “make your head explode.”