Alan GreenspanWhen John Stossel of Fox Business Network wrote his recent “Memo to Alan Greenspan” column, he recounted many of Greenspan’s failings while Chairman of the Federal Reserve, including especially Greenspan’s relentless expansion of the money supply and lowering of interest rates that set in motion the housing bubble that burst in 2007.

Freddie MacMost people — except possibly the American political class — know that one of the prime causes of the current economic crisis was government policies that resulted in countless people taking out mortgages that they couldn’t possibly pay back. Then financial firms who had made the bad mortgages issued securities backed by these shaky loans. When the borrowers defaulted, the whole house of cards came tumbling down — or at least it would have come tumbling down if the federal government hadn’t bailed out so many firms, delaying the day of reckoning.

The continuing implosion of the U.S. economy in the aftermath of unprecedented federal bailouts and unemployment programs has now brought forth a stunning loss of 484,000 jobs in a single week. What remains uncertain is when this news will penetrate the consciousness of policy makers in the White House and on Capitol Hill.

According to a new study by the Cato Institute, the gap between the haves and the have-nots in the United States continues to widen. This isn’t much of a surprise; we’ve all become accustomed to the dire warnings, mostly from anti-business liberals within the government, about the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer. The irony is that those rich, over-privileged classes include – indeed, are dominated by – government employees.

The much-anticipated, long-awaited pronouncement from the Fed yesterday confirmed what nearly everyone else expected: Things are not going swimmingly, but they’re ready to help further if the patient continues to drown.