Detail of Obama and Uncle Sam cartoonCommon sense tells us that government cannot resuscitate the American economy and restore it to good health by spending more money and going further into debt. The government cannot spend money for its "bailout" and "stimulus" programs, after all, without siphoning the money out of the economy in the first place.

Stimulus Package (Obama)The House of Representatives yesterday passed the $819 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, delivering President Obama his first major political victory and yet another setback to American taxpayers present and future. House Republicans, in a surprising display of partisan unity and commitment to principle, voted unanimously against the bill. Congressman John Boehner (R-Ohio) warned that such spending policies would bury the next generation under a "mountain of debt," while Congressman Dan Burton (R-Ind.) correctly pointed out that "free enterprise, less government and lower taxes is the way to solve this problem."

Barney FrankCongress is considering granting the Federal Reserve Bank dramatic new powers by this spring, according to the Washington Post for January 26. According to the Post, under draft legislation written by Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank (D-Mass.), the Fed would “likely be given the power to gather information about the inner workings of banks, investment firms, insurance companies, hedge funds and any other entity big enough or so intertwined with other companies that it creates the risk of a systemic collapse."

Goldman SachsA recent analysis by Goldman Sachs, one of the Wall Street investment banks which benefitted from the recent federal government bailout, concludes that the Federal Funds rate (the interest rate charged by banks on loans made to other banks) is too high, despite the fact that the rate was reduced to a record low target range of zero to 0.25 percent by the Federal Reserve on December 16 of last year.

CapitolCongress is now considering the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the latest barrel of pork to be tossed into the recessionary pit. This time around, the misnamed stimulus will, in the self-congratulatory language of the House's summative press release, "create and save 3 to 4 million jobs, jumpstart our economy, and begin the process of transforming it for the 21st century with $275 billion in economic recovery tax cuts and $550 billion in thoughtful and carefully targeted priority investments with unprecedented accountability measures built in." [Emphasis in original.]

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