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Speaking at the conference for community organizers and developers hosted by the Chicago Federal Reserve on March 31, Federal Reserve Fed Chair Janet Yellen said that the U.S. economy will need Fed stimulus for “some time.”

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy proudly announced on Thursday that his state is the first to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — bad move.

An employment service learned that unemployment would increase if the minimum wage is hiked by asking those who would be directly affected by an increase in the minimum wage.

The federal Jones Act, a 1920 shipping law, is forcing the Northeast to import expensive foreign propane for heating homes and preventing New Jersey from getting salt it needs to keep its roads clear.

Highland Park, Detroit's "own Detroit", has run out of time and money. Bankruptcy of the city once considered Detroit's crown jewel is inevitable.

NBC News special anchor Maria Shriver overlooked the very gender wage discrimination extant in the White House that she decries in her latest report.

 

 

The Federal Reserve initiated "quantitative easing" — inflating the money supply — to shore up banks and the economy. Now the Fed is doing it again — for a third time.

 

Fifty years ago this week, President Lyndon Johnson announced the “War on Poverty” during his first State of the Union Speech. Under the Obama administration, however — five decades, countless unconstitutional federal welfare programs, and more than $20 trillion later — poverty levels remain largely unchanged even based on official numbers, and dependence on government has reached unprecedented new heights.

In reality, Americans’ economic fate is far worse than even bogus government statistics would suggest. Even more troubling is that analysts say the trends look set to accelerate as Washington, D.C., intensifies its failed efforts to achieve “victory” in the “war” while the Federal Reserve conjures ever greater quantities of currency into existence.

How bad are America's fiscal woes? Evaluating our taxation, budgeting, and debt by the numbers paints a very bleak picture, indeed.

Federal unemployment ended Saturday, so now some 1.3 million people won’t be getting their $1,166 (on average) monthly check. By June, another 1.9 million will be cut off.

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