The San Francisco Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank has found that the United States will more likely than not be dipping back into formal recession over the next two years, according to an August 9 study of nine economic indicators. Study authors Travis J. Berge and Òscar Jordà concluded that “for the period 18 to 24 months in the future, the probability of recession goes above 0.5 [50 percent], putting the odds of recession slightly above the odds of expansion.”

The Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics issued a news release on August 13 stating that the “Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.3 percent in July on a seasonally adjusted basis.” The report also noted: “Over the last 12 months, the index increased 1.2 percent before seasonal adjustment.”

An April report from the International Monetary Fund promoting a world central bank and a global fiat currency went totally undetected by the global press for months, but after a blog post earlier this month on the Financial Times’ website, it is now in the media spotlight.

The New York Times' leftist columnist Paul Krugman has garnered some headlines recently for attacking the House Republican alternative budget proposal, the so-called “Roadmap to America's Future,” and its author Paul Ryan as “The Flimflam Man.” Krugman calls Ryan's plan the “audacity of dopes” and claims that it wouldn't bring the budget any further into balance than President Obama's budget.

Just one week after James Bullard of the St. Louis branch of the Federal Reserve Bank released a paper declaring that “the U.S. is closer to a Japanese-style outcome today than at any time in recent history” (meaning that the United States will likely have decades of economic stagnation, which Bullard blames on "deflation"), the news media has taken up a chorus against the bogeyman of “deflation” to explain the need for further social spending by the government and more debasement of the U.S. dollar (causing consumer prices to rise through inflation).