Despite the White House’s contentions that the United States economy is improving, Standard & Poor’s recent decision to change its outlook on U.S. fiscal health over the next two years from “stable” to “negative” tells a different tale. Besides the obvious impact such an announcement would have on the economic recovery, as well as the stock market, it also appears to play a role in the current debate over a potential raise of the debt ceiling.  

According to the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, the global economy is "one shock away from a “full-grown crisis.” In a weekend-long meeting at the World Bank building in Washington, D.C., global leaders discussed the global economy and the financial struggles that lie ahead.

IMF’s website explains of the meetings:

Gold and silver prices soared to record highs and commodities continued pushing upwards as investors seek safe havens amid growing fears about inflation and the debt crisis swamping Europe.

Complying with a court order, the Federal Reserve began releasing documents on March 31 related to one of its bailout and wealth-transfer schemes during the financial crisis. And it turns out that among the biggest beneficiaries were foreign firms, including a bank owned by Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi's central bank.

With Gov. Gary Herbert’s signature on March 25, the state of Utah became the first in recent times to officially accept gold and silver coins as legal tender at their true value, prompting praise from sound-money advocates warning about the future of the Federal Reserve System and its fiat money.

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