During a 2½ year period starting at the end of 2007, the Federal Reserve provided more than $16 trillion in secret bailouts to banks and other companies around the world, according to a government audit of some of the U.S. central bank’s operations.

A new report released by the United Nations blames the “herd” mentality of investors and poor regulation for volatile commodity prices, suggesting new global “transaction” taxes on trading and more international government involvement in controlling markets as possible solutions.

The U.S. economy experienced disappointing jobs numbers in May, according to figures released June 3 by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), leaving the unemployment rate at 9.1 percent at the end of the month.

This was not a good week for the Federal Reserve. As if Rep. Ron Paul’s (R-Texas) congressional subcommittee hearing on the relationship of the Fed to the national debt weren’t bad enough news for the central bank, media mogul and former presidential candidate Steve Forbes has just joined the anti-Fed chorus, telling Human Events that the Fed’s inflationary policies have become so destructive that a return to the gold standard is likely “within the next five years.”

Zhou XiaochuanChina's Central Bank Chairman Zhou Xiaochuan told a Chinese monetary conference last week that “Foreign-exchange reserves have exceeded the reasonable level that our country actually needs,” which is essentially code for China won't be buying U.S. government debt any more. China's foreign currency reserves exceeded $3 trillion at the end of March, more than $1 trillion of which is U.S. government debt.