The Obama administration continues to set unfavorable conditions for businesses to prosper, this time through overbearing new fuel standards that auto dealers fear will “price out millions of buyers from the new car market.” If that were to happen, the new standards would undermine the touted benefits of the environmental program while simultaneously infringing upon the auto industry’s chance for a full recovery.

A combination of several factors, including a declining dollar and the Federal Reserve’s announcement that it would keep interest rates at virtually zero until late 2014, helped to send gold and silver prices soaring to multi-week highs. Analysts expect the upward trend to continue as paper currencies founder and gloomy news continues to dominate the economic headlines.

Last Friday’s unemployment numbers, on the surface at least, appeared to reflect a growing, albeit slowly, economy. The number of new unemployment claims for the week ending January 14th dropped to 352,000, down from 402,000 the previous week, and down from 415,000 a year ago. The four-week moving average also dropped, from 382,500 to 379,000.

Kodak filmAfter 131 years, it appears that Eastman Kodak will be declaring Chapter 11 bankruptcy before the end of the month, according to the Wall Street Journal. It is currently seeking to sell off some of its 10,000 patents in order to stave off the inevitable, but the company is burning through its remaining cash reserves and credit lines rapidly. The last time Kodak was profitable was 2007 when its stock traded at $30 a share. On Friday, its last trade was at $0.37 a share. It’s in the process of being de-listed from the New York Stock Exchange, and Moody’s has downgraded the company’s credit to junk status.

The Washington Post’s editorial celebrating the ending of ethanol subsidies iterated the same free-market positions taken by Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) and other Austrian school economists about those subsidies. Calling the 45-cent-per-gallon tax credit supporting U.S. corn-based ethanol production and the 54-cent-per-gallon tariff on imported ethanol “two of the most wasteful subsidies ever to clutter the Internal Revenue Code,” the Post estimated that ending those subsidies will save the U.S. taxpayer approximately $6 billion this year.