In a move heralding the Obama administration’s most aggressive intervention in the business sector to date, the federal government has forced GM CEO Rick Wagoner to step down. The change in leadership was announced by GM in a statement released in Wagoner’s name on Monday. In it, the former CEO said the government asked him to leave. “On Friday I was in Washington for a meeting with administration officials,” Wagoner begins. “In the course of that meeting, they requested that I ‘step aside’ as CEO of GM, and so I have.”

On February 4, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) introduced the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2009 (H.R. 875) in the House. Its stated objective sounds rather benign — even beneficial: "To establish the Food Safety Administration within the Department of Health and Human Services to protect the public health by preventing food-borne illness, ensuring the safety of food, improving research on contaminants leading to food-borne illness, and improving security of food from intentional contamination, and for other purposes."

AIGFor the fourth time in six months, the federal government is giving billions of taxpayer dollars to AIG, following the latter’s announcement of a $61.7 billion fourth quarter loss — this despite the massive bailout shoveled AIG’s way by the Bush administration last September. By the terms of this latest lifeline (“life support” would be a more apt metaphor, since the patient has been clinically dead for many months), the federal government is extending an additional $30 billion in loans to the former insurance giant and allowing more lax repayment terms on an additional $38 billion credit line from the Federal Reserve.

Figuring prominently in President Barack Obama’s newly released budget proposal for fiscal 2010 is another massive bank bailout. The Bush administration’s gargantuan $700 billion bank boondoggle was bad enough, but President Obama, not to be outdone, is proposing a positively pantagruelian $750 billion in additional relief for America’s beleaguered money-center banks.

CitiGroupThough the Obama administration continues to deny it, the U.S. government continues to move closer to nationalizing the nation’s largest banks. The last week of February the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department both announced that the federal government may convert the shares of preferred stock it already owns in Citigroup and other banks into common shares, thereby acquiring voting rights and a greater measure of outright control over the institutions.